It can be said that solopreneurs’ impact isn’t as large as an agency’s impact. Although this is true for numbers, it can be argued the authenticity and niche market knowledge that local influencers bring to collaborations is critical. Entrepreneurs and local influencers make great collaborators. After 10 years of community collaborating I have found some nuggets along the way. Let’s review some snags of building authentic collaborations or what I have labeled cooks, mirrors, and keeping pace for collaborations and conversations.

Cooks

Unlike the popular saying, there are too many cooks in the kitchen, my mantra is there’s enough space for everyone to cook and there is enough food, money, commerce, or whatever you need to grow. The trick is having balance and getting outside opinions when they are needed. You have projects and people, it takes people to make projects so show up as human as possible.  

Figure out a system to talk; it can be weekly check-in’s, calendars, Evernote, Slack, try to avoid email for project building. I have used Basecamp and I enjoyed it. But in my years, it wasn’t the tools of communication it was the limiting, it was the thought of scarcity. When the gatekeepers would view their resources as finite and set up barriers for others to access. Social Justice collaborators know what I speak of in the nonprofit sector.

Mirrors

Books are not always a good mirror for identity. Neither is comparing your business mind to your potential clients’, or assuming your clients needs. It’s about them, not you. It’s advisable to have a process to assess their needs. Yes, talk to them about your success because after all that’s why they hired you because of your confidence, knowledge, and accomplishments.

When approaching their needs or solutions take the time to know them. This seems super basic, and for me it came from years of working retail. Although I was not a manager, I was dependable and responsible. My perspective might not be what the client needs. That is why networking is a great reflection of who is your ideal client, network with others so they can refer people to you.

Keeping pace for collaboration and communication.

Take your time and find the vehicle (or application) to do this with efficiency and courtesy. Meet people where they are at. But keep your own planning tools, and remember to keep your own promises.


About the Author:

Araceli Esparza is the founder and owner of Wisconsin Mujer a multi media social engagement company that specializes in cultivating content and connecting hearts. We help companies and nonprofits build bridges with donors and audiences to create authentic connection strategies that have a positive impact on minority and marginalized communities.  

“Curating ideas, Cultivating actions, Connecting hearts”

Our knowledge of targeted outreach comes from over ten years of working in fundraising and program development positions with local government, colleges, and large non-profit agencies. We are the connector for your campaign needs. As a social media consultant, Araceli has coached many minority business owners, universities, nonprofits on press releases, approaching cultural shifts, strategic marketinging, professional development, event planning, fundraising, entrepreneurship, and content creation.

Wisconsin Mujer has been featured in Wisconsin State Journal as 2018 Wisconsin’s Most Influential Latina and as a guest on Wisconsin Public Radio’s Wisconsin Life. Araceli Esparza has been a speaker at many conferences and workshops.

Links:

www.wisconsinmujer.com 

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https://www.linkedin.com/in/araceliesparza

https://tierra-arte-y-cultura-en-wisconsin.mailchimpsites.com/

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